Bogey Central Easter Egg
niraj.com
A Niraj
Sanghvi
Website


symbii.com | Something You Might Be Interested In
A collection of funny, interesting, and crazy stories you might be interested in
     
Site Tools


Login/Register
Forgot my password
Click to Register (Why?)


Recent Stories
RSS feed

Recent Comments
Anonymous said: Whether that's true or not, that's...
Posted 1344 days ago

Anonymous said: His wife is an agent, I believe,...
Posted 1344 days ago

Anonymous said: You know it's back when it's 2012...
Posted 1850 days ago

Anonymous said: I've been DYING for a way to insert...
Posted 2014 days ago

Anonymous said: niraj isn't playing by the spirit...
Posted 2241 days ago

Anonymous said: So you know how SNL does 3 weeks...
Posted 2249 days ago

Comments RSS feed


Installments
Rant On...
This Week in 24
This Week in Entourage
Tremendous Upside w/ Dave & Niraj

$3 billion to keep us watching TVTV
A story in the Washington Post describes how the Senate just approved a subsidy of $3 billion to pay for the converter boxes that will be needed by people who have older TVs when they make the switch from analog transmissions to all-digital broadcasts.
Committee Chairman Ted Stevens, R-Alaska, said Congress needs to do something to help consumers with the older analog sets, an estimated 21 million households. "If we're mandating this (digital) conversion, we cannot leave people behind because they can't afford" digital television sets, he said.

The draft of a House bill would end analog transmissions on Dec. 31, 2008. It does not mention a subsidy for set-top converter boxes. So, lawmakers will likely have to work out differences between the two bills, though Stevens said he did not anticipate a big fight with the House over the deadline or the subsidy.

The subsidy program would be paid for by money raised from the auction of the analog spectrum the broadcasters are vacating. The subsidy would be available for all those households with older televisions, and it would pay for converter boxes for all the TVs in a particular household, regardless of financial status.

Stevens estimates that the converter boxes would cost about $50. His plan would call for the government to pay roughly $40, and the consumer would make a co-payment of $10.


Interesting info on how the date of the switch was picked:
The seemingly random date of April 7, 2009, isn't all that random. Stevens wanted to make sure that any digital switch wouldn't come in the middle of popular programming during the holidays, football bowl games, and the March Madness college basketball playoffs.


Submitted by  |  0 comments | Story hits by day
Rate this story:
  • Currently 0.00/5 Stars
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
    Currently 0.00/5 Stars, based on 0 votes


More Stories | Post a comment


To reply to the article, click the 'Post a comment' link above. To reply to a specific comment, click on 'Reply to this comment' under the specific comment below.


    Leave a Comment:
    You are not logged in...commenting anonymously.
    Note: All links will be nofollowed.


    This story is more than 6 months old, so comments have been disabled.